1937/TALL/TALES/GAZETTE/HATHAWAY/JONES/TALL/TALES/FESTIVAL/BAGNELL/OREGON/ON-LINE/UNDERGROUND/NEWS/PUBLICATION/ELLENSVILLE/1937

ARCHIVED STORY 04-01-65
BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE STAFF AT TALL TALES GAZETTE


Historical Reports from the Gazette Archives 04.01.65

The weather had been warmer than usual, the rain had fallen harder than its normal amounts. The snow melt and the rain combined for the great flood of 1964. The story has been told to no end, everyone who was there and lived through it will tell you their tale of water up to here, the almost completed bridge floating past their house. They will tell you of how everyone ran out to rescue their neighbor and their pets.

But what you don't hear much of is the treasure that was uncovered, moved down stream and deposited just 2 miles west of Bagnell.

In a small corner of the bend in the mighty river the waters began to recede and there half buried in the red clay mud was a box. A box that was similar in size to the cast iron caskets used during the Civil War. Ten bolts on each side held the box together.

Most who boated past it felt that it was washed up from some long forgotten cemetery that had been unearthed during the flood.

But one curious person who has asked to remain nameless, decided that he should at least see if he could free it from the mud and take it to a dry place. Preventing it from being washed into the waiting sea, just a few more miles to the west.

Thinking that it could be interned later, he struggled for almost an hour to free it from the mud. Most who passed by felt he was just one of many clearing debris. None stopped to help.

After nearly an hour the box had not budged more than a foot or so. With one last tug, the cast iron box broke open, but its contents did not spill out, the contents was also not what the man in the boat was expecting.

Days later, the man who discovered the box was at the new car dealership in town, buying a new truck for himself and a new car for his wife he happened to run into a neighbor, this neighbor was also buying a new pickup truck, he was going to haul his new boat and trailer with his new truck.

 Now the two had known each other for years, each knew that the other was not a man of means but . . . as their brains processed what was taking place they smiled and said nothing more about what each of them had pulled from the mud along the banks of the mighty river as flood water receded.

You may know of whom I speak, they are now two of the wealthiest families, and they were living here during the great flood of 1964. They always have the nicest cars, biggest fishing boats, they give to all the charitable causes in town and they never seem to be down on their luck when logging or tourism takes a down turn.

All because of a couple of cast iron boxes that were revealed during the flood of 1964.

 

 

 

 


(EDITORS NOTE; Rumors are heard more as quiet mumblings about a place the old timers know as the mouth of Sanders Crik.

That name has changed slightly as time has passed. But many believe the cast iron box came down the creek from some 'secret camp' less than a mile upstream.

Others believe the box fell from an overturned ferry boat that was trying to deliver it's cargo to San Francisco in the late 1881 and was swept over board during a storm and washed towards the angry sea, that is only a few miles farther to the west.

The cargo was owned by a man named
R. D. Hume. Most thought his loss was canned salmon or some other perishable goods. But rescue efforts went on for months, too long and too expensive to just be some canned goods.)








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1937/TALL/TALES/GAZETTE/HATHAWAY/JONES/TALL/TALES/FESTIVAL/BAGNELL/OREGON/ON-LINE/UNDERGROUND/NEWS/PUBLICATION/ELLENSVILLE/1937